Design Systems Thinking Post 5 by Jessica Clark

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/marketing-and-sales/our-insights/building-a-design-driven-culture

This article touches heavily on the importance of customer value. It touches on the experience of the people receiving the design and why that matters so much. I feel there is a strong correlation between passion in the designers and excitement in the receivers. If you are not making something you care about. Why should anyone else care? The empathy for design comes from human passion and senses. This is what drives designers to create a product so lovable that it cant do anything else except create an incredible user experience. This is where the magic happens. When we are creating for people, we are creating with a purpose. “Increasingly, it’s difficult to separate these two elements, and we’re actually seeing many cases where customers prioritize the experience of buying and using a product over the performance of the product itself.” This speaks mountains towards the amount of weight even subconsciously one may pu ton feelings and feelings alone. I personally think its incredible how much we navigate life through experience and initial reactions. One may not even know this is what they are doing when they buy a product. “Oh I like that one because it is purple so I am buying that one not the one with stripes.” Smart designers are aware of this notion. Smart designers tap into this and use it at their advantage. I think smart design involves a couple of different steps in the process. Ideation about what could work, user testing to check your hypotheses and a round of edits to fine tune based on feedback, giving you what could be your final product. Smart design is adaptive and listens. Smart design designs for an audience.

 

McKinsey & Company

Jennifer Kilian - Hugo Sarrazin - Hyo Yeon

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/marketing-and-sales/our-insights/building-a-design-driven-culture

Design Systems Thinking Post 4 by Jessica Clark

This article is about ways of thinking within design. The author here focusses on systematic approaches towards problem solving and design thinking. It walks us through research and how important it is in our design process. Research is the heart of design. It drives and backs meaning behind our design process. It also challenges the fact of visual communication relating to the problem at hand or message. I think sometimes it is easy for me to get carried away in the thick of design and forgetting about the goal. When people use design thinking they use stepping stones in their process. They practice the notion of try, fail, try again. This is a very powerful and relatable concept on a daily level as a creative. I find myself just taking risks only to fall on my face and redo the whole process. This is a beautiful part of design that I love. I think there are so many key lessons we can learn from failing. The process looks something like identifying the goals of the project at hand, defining the problem that you are trying to solve, have a phase of ideation or thinking creatively without bounds, try a bunch of stuff good or bad and then launch through the process of creating the final product that endured all the critique phases. With design thinking in mind, next systems thinking branches off of the idea of something being designs and has first and foremost the concerns of the long-lasting characteristics of the design. My design process usually consists of asking the question, studying the possible outcomes and creating a game pan to solve the problem presented. I felt this article touched on some important concepts towards the process of design systems that are very applicable in our daily lives as creatives.

Noble, Ian, and Russell Bestley. Visual Research: An Introduction to Research Methodologies in Graphic Design. Lausanne: AVA, 2005. Print.

Design Systems Thinking Post 3 by Jessica Clark

http://www.designkit.org

Human centered design speaks mountains in the real world. I feel this is the core of why we do what we do, to hopefully make someone’s day out there better. The power of “I see you, I hear you” in design interactions is breathtakingly powerful. The acknowledgment of clear steps moving forwards can really change the pace of a design process. Design that is truly for others is the needle in the haystack when it comes to our industry. Design that shows empathy and understanding towards the content its displaying is truly powerful. It is obvious to both the client and the audience when you care and have an immersed understanding of the content you are creating. Passion seeps through work. Excitement is transparent in this field and translated in a very positive light for all. This is what we should be striving for. We should be listening, learning and acting. With empathy and an open ear, comes knowledge, clear understand and good design. I feel with core mindsets of learning form our failures, being empathetic towards clients/team members, using a strong sense of optimism and creative confidence, odds are your design will be successful. Attitude is the first step in the process to understanding others needs and at the end of the day, design in the big scary real world is just that - understanding and creating for others. Through clear communication, execution, iteration, feedback and more iteration, a design can really thrive when there is a positive relationship between client and designer. I feel the client should really be driving the feedback process as they are the experts when it comes to the overall goal of the design. They should be driving the trajectory of a meeting as at the end of the day, we are delivering for them.

Design Systems Thinking Post 2 by Jessica Clark

https://www.aiga.org/case-study-nothing

I found this project to be really inspiring. Not only did this creative team focus strongly on their audience in ideation, but they delivered a project that solved a problem for that audience. The Nothing project really inspires me as an artist. When I think of a project that assesses who they are talking to, strategizes and creates, I now think of this project. The issue this Rhode Island team tackled was a lack of donation towards food banks while the area was severely being hit with food shortage issues. The Rhode Island team realized no one was donating cash to the cause so they decided to make something physical, something people could walk into the store and purchase while supporting the cause. I felt this ideation was a terrific response to their users as they analyzed the behavior of customers and adapted to a design goal. The cans themselves are empty when you break the seal, bland colored and very sterile in comparison to another food branding because they wanted to communicate the loss of these resources. Stores said having these cans on market shelves encouraged customers to donate through purchasing and struck up several conversations about the issue at hand. 

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Design Thinking Post One by Jessica Clark

This article differentiated design thinking and systems thinking. Design thinking often lends its hands to the ability to problem solve while systems thinking  "Design Thinkers have described DT as a systematic approach to problem-solving that starts from considering the customers and how to create a better picture for them." People who execute design thinking use stepping stones in their process. They practice the notion of try, fail, try again. This is a very powerful and relatable concept on a daily level as a creative. I find myself just taking risks only to fall on my face and redo the whole process. This is a beautiful part of design that I love. The process looks something like identify the goals of the project at hand, define the problem that you are trying to solve, have a phase of ideation or thinking creatively without bounds, try a bunch of stuff good or bad and then launch through the process of creating the final product that endured all the critique phases. With design thinking in mind, next systems thinking branches off of the idea of something being designs and has first and foremost the concerns of the long-lasting characteristics of the design. The question usually pops up of "I have this product but want to get rid of it, what happens when I want an updated version of what's already there?" These two ways of thinking about design both revolve around HCD or human-centered design. The human-centered design idea basically projects the main idea that we should not stray from who we are creating for, of course. Human-centered design reminds us to focus on the people we are creating for. This way of thinking can really help focus the design not on our selves but on others. I believe it to take the selfishness out of design if it is done correctly. I think the first thing we should always keep in check when designing is that our heart is in the right place. 

 

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NASA design by Jessica Clark

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7E8gNjjC1g4

David Delgato + Dan Goods talk about experience design in this video. They tell us about their experience and intent behind some of the installations they have made in their careers. They tell us about a few different visual pieces and the way that they hope for the world to experience them. The first couple designs they walked us through contained elements such as light, fog, and heafty materials. These projects were very interestingly constructed all with creative intent for learning purposes. Another project they talked about involved sound to tell a story. A huge project they tackled was in relation to Juno, which is a space orbit that was launched. They designed a way of communicating with morse code to the Juno spacecraft from radio transmissions. They were actually able to design a way to communicate with a spacecraft which is beyond incredible to be able to give people living in this world the opportunity to stretch out of what they know here on Earth. In addition to working during the day at NASA, David and Dan do side passion projects. One example included the Museum of Awe. When brainstorming for this Museum they put a lot of thought into what the mission of this museum would be and also what form this museum would take. Would the theme of awe and wonder be captured best in a pop up museum or in a stationary building? They talked about human wonder. This museum has not been created yet, but will be a communal exhibition of designs that lead to audience curiosity. Their goal is for unity within our community to have tons of people contribute ideas and galleries. A huge theme throughout their designs I noticed was designing in response to how it is a miracle and a privilege to be alive. This is a beautiful realization and creates so much depth in their designs. Dan and David’s designs seem to awaken curiosity and provoke learning for their viewers. They revolve around experience and embrace human tendency to make sense of what’s around us. Their process typically starts with ideation revolving around an emotional human connection, followed by reorientation and experimentation. They talked about asking the clearest most basic questions in a professional setting in order to be successful. David and Dan say that is their number one take away from working in this field and working on projects like these at NASA.

Stage Design by Jessica Clark

https://www.netflix.com/watch/80093809?trackId=200257859

In this episode, Es walks us through what she does as a stage designer. I found this look into her life to be very insightful into the process of designing a space. Designing a space requires a very creative and particular mind. A few ingredients she uses in her process include: space, light, darkness, scale and time. What I have learned from Es in this episode is that her job requires a very hands on ideation approach. she always starts with finding the task at hand, learning about it and then creating mock ups. Just for watching her, I can tell that she is not afraid to make mistakes. She seems to have an insane level of ambitious drive. She wildly throws ideas that pour meaning into what is already there. She started with bands because that was just what was given to her, designing for music provides her with poetic themes to build off of. I thought it was interesting the way she uses light to design in a very tech looking way. Mirrors seem to be a very key component for her when working on stage design because of the inception-like mind games they play not the audience. Es likes to deconstruct what is visible and play with optical illusions in her spacial stage designs. This allows the audience space to think and interpret her visual elements. Through this episode I learned about exploration with use of materials. It feels as if Es has no boundaries as to what materials she uses in order to execute a specific feeling in her stage designs. She talks about the shift of media and how now it emphasizes what is seen at a concert due to social media. Shows have more exposure than ever before, therefore whatever she designs will be seen by many different angles. Something I have served about her is that she takes life experiences and adapts them to design. I think this is an interesting theme that most artists use, especially very talented ones. The pieces she make are very vulnerable and dynamic. There is so much thought put into each design she creates. This is a powerful thing as so much emotion is captured within each design. She does a tremendous amount of preproduction to prepare for each stage design, adding so much to the value to the final product that gets put into the spotlight.